Our First Newsletter!

The Editor Uncategorized

TTMADRS Newsletter v.3 jan201

If you didn’t receive this via email, leave your name and email address in the Contact Us section and we’ll put you on our mailing list for future issues. Share this widely; we want to spread the word.  If you have a suggestion for a new name for us, leave your ideas in the Contact Us section.

Benefits of Dance, Music, Creativity and Social Contact

The Editor Uncategorized

Here’s a NYT article with good information about aging well, including dancing.

https://www.nytimes.com/guides/well/how-to-age-well

And this article is specifically about the effects of contra dancing. ” A new study that compared the neurological effects of country dancing with those of walking and other activities suggests that there may be something unique about learning a social dance.”

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/03/29/well/walk-stretch-or-dance-dancing-may-be-best-for-the-brain.html

 

Reference Guide to all CCRCs in N.C.

The Editor Uncategorized

Here’s a link to an incredibly informative Reference Guide from the NC Insurance Commissioner’s office, comparing ALL the licensed CCRC’s in the entire state!
You probably don’t want to peruse all 99 pages. These are the pages we identified as most useful in the 2016 guide; we think they are numbered the same in this year’s version:
pdf pp. 4-8: explanation of terms
pdf p 9:  map and names (with reference numbers) of all NC CCRC’s
pdf pp 68-71:  summary of contract and refund options
pdf pp 71-74:  summary of other services and features
To find an individual CCRC pdf page, add 9 to its map number.
We recommend that you check the map on p. 9; look at and compare the ones in Durham, Chapel Hill, Raleigh, and perhaps Burlington and Greensboro, as well as Pennybyrn (#27, pdf p. 36), which uses the Household model.  In addition, the fee ranges on the individual pages can give you a sense of current local pricing.
When you click on the link it may automatically download the PDF to your computer, depending on your settings.

Dancing past retirement!

The Editor Uncategorized

Here’s some serious silliness on a topic most of us don’t often sing and dance about. Please don’t be scared away by the caption; it’s lots of fun.

The Household Model and ActionPact

The Editor Uncategorized

Our plans include a vibrant, musical environment where all of us can continue to enjoy the activities we love for as long as possible. We are also thoughtfully planning for the period of life when we slow down so much we need a lot of assistance. If you’ve ever been dismayed by the institutional, impersonal feel of many ‘nursing homes’ you may think that a retirement community is a sad and depressing place. The “Household Model” is a relatively new approach that we plan to implement. This comes from the website of Action Pact, the development group we’ve contracted with to guide the design process. That process begins in January, 2018!
“Each household has decision-making autonomy and is consistently staffed. Residents get up when they want, bathe how and when they want, go to bed when they want, eat when and what they want and decide how they will spend their day. Household life is “normal,” spontaneous and full of new experiences. Quality of Care and Quality of Life are of the highest and benefit from a symbiotic relationship.”

Learn more at http://actionpact.com/household/household_model.

Now Accepting Donations of Stock, September 2016

The Editor Uncategorized

TTMADRS is now able to accept donations of stock or mutual fund shares into a Schwab brokerage account. In some situations, there are tax advantages for donating appreciated shares instead of cash. Basically a person who wants to donate stock contacts Schwab (or their broker does), gives our name (“Triangle Traditional Music and Dance Retirement Society” in full) and what they want to donate. Please Contact Us with any questions you have about this process.

Book and Film Recommendations, April 2016

The Editor Uncategorized

Both this book and DVD reflect the philosophy and motivation of the Traditional Music and Dance Retirement Society and our pioneering vision of how we want to live in old age.

Many of us have seen a clip from ALIVE INSIDE; now the entire film is available to purchase or to stream from Netflix or I-tunes.

ALIVE INSIDE is a joyous cinematic exploration of music’s capacity to reawaken our souls and uncover the deepest parts of our humanity. Filmmaker Michael Rossato-Bennett chronicles the astonishing experiences of individuals around the country who have been revitalized through the simple experience of listening to music. His camera reveals the uniquely human connection we find in music and how its healing power can triumph where prescription medication falls short.

This stirring documentary follows social worker Dan Cohen, founder of the nonprofit organization Music & Memory, as he fights against a broken healthcare system to demonstrate music’s ability to combat memory loss and restore a deep sense of self to those suffering from it. Rossato-Bennett visits family members who have witnessed the miraculous effects of personalized music on their loved ones, and offers illuminating interviews with experts including renowned neurologist and best-selling author Oliver Sacks (Musicophilia: Tales of Music and the Brain) and musician Bobby McFerrin (“Don’t Worry, Be Happy”). An uplifting cinematic exploration of music and the mind, ALIVE INSIDE’s inspirational and emotional story left audiences humming, clapping and cheering at the 2014 Sundance Film Festival, where it won the Audience Award.

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Being Mortal, by Atul Gawande, is groundbreaking and brilliant. Many of you have already read it. If not, this might pique your interest.
Here’s a summary from a NYT review and a link to the full review. This should be easy to find at your local book store.

“Being Mortal,” is a personal meditation on how we can better live with age-related frailty, serious illness and approaching death.  It is also a call for a change in the philosophy of health care. Gawande writes that members of the medical profession, himself included, have been wrong about what their job is. Rather than ensuring health and survival, it is “to enable well-being.”